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into effect just moments ago. >> that's right. the deal was announced in cairo by the egyptian foreign minister and the u.s. secretary of state. the truce calls for an immediate halt to the fighting and reportedly aims to work towards a longer-term solution as well. >> the latest escalation in violence began just over a week ago. since then, some 140 palestinians and five israelis have been killed in air strikes and rocket attacks. >> we will be trying to go live to cairo and also to gauze in a moment, but first, let's get back to evens earlier in it -- earlier in the day that threatens to derail the talks -- we will be trying to go live to cairo and also to gaza in a moment. >> panic on the streets of televisa. ambulances rushed to the scene of the explosion. -- panic on the streets of tel aviv. the bus was burned out but not torn apart, suggesting it may have been a relatively small bomb. israel is calling this a terrorist attack. >> hamas is a murderous organization, an organization that calls for israel's destruction. anyone who negotiates with them and the prime minister's holding
provided money to the egyptian government for their successful mediating. >> thank you very much. our cairo correspondent joins us on . we have conflicting reports. hamas as a truce has been negotiated. israel says not yet. what's going on? >> it is very unclear. this afternoon, they said the ceasefire was going to be tonight and then hamas in cairo says there is supposed to be a press conference right now as we speak. and, soon after, they say that there might be a ceasefire agreement, but they are not sure. we know that, as we speak, they're surrounded by artillery so there's no sound on the ground. >> it is not necessarily close. of their close to reaching a deal, what will be the terms? >> there are four 0.7. the first is that israel promises they will stop the killing of hamas officials. the second is hamas, their point, they will not fire rockets and more into israel. then as some kind of the easing of gaza. it has not really been decided on that point. and egypt wants to be a part of the agreement. >> . for the update. >> turkey says there close to formally asking nato for patriot mi
. >>> and now to egypt. demonstrators there have taken to the streets in cairo to protest against president mohamed morsi. morsi expanded his powers this week, and that means no one can challenge his decisions. they can't be overturned. that's led to anger among the people and some of the judges. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. >> reporter: thanks have calmed down considerably in cairo's tahrir square. still demonstrators out in tahrir, especially those who pitched tents overnight but the numbers not as what we saw on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express wha
in this process. i will carry this message to cairo tomorrow. i will also be consulting with president abas in ramala. let me also say to echo the prime minister, i'm very pleased that the iron dome defense system is performing so well. our partnership in support of this system represents america's enduring commitment to the safety and security of the israeli people and to israel's right to defend itself. but no defense is perfect. and our hearts break for the loss of every civilian israeli and palestinian and for all those who have been wounded or who are living in fear and danger. i know today was a difficult day. and i offer my deepest condolences to the loved ones of those who were lost and injured. in the end there is no substitute for security and for a just and lasting peace. and the current crisis certainly focuses us on the urgency of this broader goal. so in the days ahead the united states will work with our partners here in israel and across the region toward an outcome that bolsters security for the people of israel, improves conditions for the people of gaza and moves toward a
into the central square in cairo to call for an end to the new egyptian leader's regime. it was an enormous show of strength from the opposition that spent days blasting egypt he is new president, morsi. he upset just about everybody last week when he decided to give himself broad new powers that say his decisions don't need approval from any court. essentially he's above the law. really no different than a dictator. protests showed their across the country, some of them violent. street fighting this between demonstrators and police. president morsi tried to calm the criticism by promising to reserve his new powers for only the most important decisions. but that didn't appease the protesters. remember, just last week, the united states was publicly praising president morsi when he helped end the conflict between israel and gaza. the white house says president obama has not spoken to his egyptian counterpart since then and today the press secretary jay carney said basically the egyptians need to work this out themselves. there is no evidence that will happen any time soon. right now this enormous
onto the streets. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo with the latest. hi, steve. >> reporter: gregg, behind me we're seeing the start of violence at this major demonstration in cairo. you see crowds off to my right, the tens of thousands who have gathered here beginning to run. we've seen tear gas fired as well as molotov cocktails. this big crowd here today, the biggest we've seen in some time, is really in reaction to what the new egyptian president did yesterday, muhammad morsi issuing some stunning information, first, that any decree he issues will be legal and that any declaration he issues is final and cannot be appealed by anyone, including the courts. the new egyptian president has basically, on paper, put himself above the law here saying the courts have no say, and obviously, there's a lot of people -- tens of thousands of egyptians -- who are not happy with it. morsi supporters say this was a necessary move to try to get rid of holdovers from the old regime of hosni mubarak. they say it's only temporary until they get a new constitution. but opponents are furious a
has more from cairo. >> yeg, some dramatic developments here in cairo. egypt's president trying to expand his own powers dramatically, saying that any of his presidential decrees issued since he took office six months ago cannot be overturned by anybody, including the courts. and that those previous officials who could be implicated in murdering demonstrators during the revolution a year ago would be retried. as one morsey opponent put it, he is basically putting himself above the having no one to check his powers. we have seen street protests. those protests could grow dramatically with these new announcements by the egyptian president. it comes on the heels of a real diplomatic success in the world spotlight here. president morsey helping to negotiate a cease-fire between israel and hamas. really, making the unusual step of receiving praise from all sides from u.s. officials from hamas, even from some israeli officials for his pragmatism but certainly that imagine that tism in its own rule here could be put to the test almost immediately. with new decrees expanding his power,
to unicef to provide education and trauma support for children and water and sanitation services. in cairo last week i called on other countries to increase their contribution to the relief effort which the u.n. has described as critically underfund. however, what is urgently needed is a political transition to new and legitimate leadership that reflects the will of the syrian people and that can end the violence and begin to rebuild the country is regional and international support. on the 13th of november, there was a major breakthrough in doha with the establishment of syrian and opposition forces which has been welcomed by many syrians. last friday i met the president and two of the vice presidents of the national coalition on their first visit to europe. i sought assurances from them in three areas. first, i urged them to commit themselves to gone -- build their political structures. second, i encouraged them to use the next friends of syria meeting -- which we hope will be held in morocco next month -- to set out a plan for syria's future in detail. >> and third, a clear commitment t
in egypt. we have been watching crowds of protestors grow bigger all day in the heart of cairo where people are increasingly angry about a move by egypt's president tow grand himself sweeping new powers. he says his decree is only them appraiser raoerbg temporary, allows him to ignore the courts. he says it's in the best interest of his country. the egyptians are not sure. joining me is a strategic analyst. he says i don't have to listen to anybody, i'm the president i have to get this country in order. there you have it. what do you make of today and the protests we're seeing? >> the protests we're seeing, we'll have to wait and see what the estimates are for the crowd size, but they are absolutely critical, because a counter revolution has set in and iffy egyptians want to rescue democracy, and -- have a constitution to treat all citizens equally the forces of liberalism, of secularism of moderation need to win this one. the fate of egypt really is on the line, because if morsi is able to weather this demonstration he will be able to push in islam influence, sharia law constitution. when
's call of duty, heading up to capitol hill to broker a debt deal. dagen: u.s. embassy closed in cairo amid protests, of bid muhamed morsi's power grab. connell: can you hear me now syndrome, wireless carriers are ranked on their performance. we will have the worst and the best. dagen: stocks now lend every 15 minutes, nicole petallides at stock exchange with economic news this morning. is that what is giving the market a lift? nicole: we have a lot going on here. we have jobless claims for the second week, that is good news, you saw growth in economy and in the last few moments we moved higher and we are positive for the week. when you check it out and industrials we are up 44 points and most of those names on the dow are in the green, names like hewlett-packard and caterpillar and bank of america and united healthcare doing well. the fiscal cliff headline after headline continues to be in the forefront and on everybody's mind that this is what we are seeing, a decent market and the u.s. dollar being weaker today has been a factor in the strength we are seeing as well. connell: treasu
transpired in cairo. as a consequence of the video. >> reporter: and right after that, during that news briefing that we heard, we heard from actually senator lindsey graham, senator kelly ayotte and senator john mccain, all of them stating those comments are completely wrong. senator graham going so far to say, people don't bring mortars, grenades to spontaneous demonstrations. think basically wanted to know why ambassador rise in the first place, went on public television, went on television on five sunday morning talk programs five days after the september 11th attacks and failed to give an adequate definition of what took place there. that is what they're drilling down trying to find out. they are left more troubled it seems with ambassador rice's comments. jenna: kelly, how did this meeting come about the? was it requested by the senators? was it something the ambassador wanted to do? how did it come about today? >> reporter: you look at backdrop, senator john mccain said he would welcome any meeting with ambassador rice. she initiated this. ambassador rice emerged as you know as f
, secretary of state clinton will fly to cairo, egypt to meet with prime minister morsi that has been holding peace talkings. >> brian: yesterday we are talking about peace talk and hear a cease fire kicking in and we know it department happen and the bombing didn't stop. and this, this morning lerand viter is in tel aviv where a bomb went off in the city. leland. >> i am setting the scene for you on my israeli answer to the pentagon. a city threw a bomb on to the bus or left one it is not a suicide bomber, but 10 people were injured. three of them very seriously wounded here in this attack. the two suspects on the list would be hamas or islamic jihad, both operating out of the gaza strip. hamas is peace talks and trying to figure out if a cease fire over israel with the rockets and the bombings on the other side going into the gaza strip . islamic jihad has a different agend a. they are backers in iran who are pushing for rocket fire against the gaz strip. we should have a shot up of this on our live view, you can actually see this bus that stopped. this harkens back to the days of the secon
@cnbc.com. >>> back to the middle east. ban ki-moon has called for an immediate cease fire in gaza. speaking in cairo, he's warned that any israeli ground operation must be avoided. the country has decided to hold off on planneds for a ground invasion. oil prices currently trading slightly lower. brent crude sitting close to a one month high at the moment. joining us for how is head of commodity market strategy. we'll get to harry in a few moments. he's miking up. meanwhile, china firmly on track. this doesn't mean in-flows to the mainland is expanding. latest data showed another contraction extending the longest run in falls of three years as corporates continue to cut back on spending because of global growth uncertainties. china drew in $913797 billion in fdi money between january to march, down 3.45% compared to last year's figures. harry is now good. let's kick off with previously renewed tensions and violence in the gaza strip hasn't fed in. >> i think the latest events add an additional layer to pre-existing geopolitical tensions. but the current geography of the events over the past couple da
plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on by a panel dominated by president's morsi's political allies, neither all of them islamists. the constitution gives islamic sharia law a more specific role in government and doesn't guarantee women's equality. it also empowers the state to defend morals and values. critics like human rights lawyer say that could
prince of qatar and cairo. even the tunisian prime minister that's visited gaza, and this is a muslim brotherhood president who has very close ties to hamas and, therefore, he is a valid interlocuture. >> i don't think they want to see a ground war or an extension of this conflict because it will destabilize an already destabilized region, especially considering what's happening in syria. >> ambassador let's talk about israeli politics as former ambassador to israel, you know the political system there well. we just finished our election. there's an election coming up in january. how much of this could possibly be the prime minister showing the strength of his administration as he stands there at the boarder? >> i think there's an element of that. i think the first thing is the fact that the rockets, especially the rockets that have a range of about 45 to 46 miles and that can come close to even tel aviv, that that is the immediate catalyst for this operation, but there's no doubt that prime minister netanyahu see some political utility in showing a hard line to protect israel's natio
. and a big name governor says he's in. clashes in cairo as egypt's president continues to push the limits of his power. but first today's trivia question. who holds the record as both the youngest and the oldest governor ever in his state's history? wanna see me get some great deals? ok! it's a new way to get cash back deals and it's called bankamerideals. i sign in to my online banking... click the "cash back deals" tab... and pick the deals i want. i just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay. and then i get up to 15% cash back... put into my account! i know, right? [ male announcer ] introducing bankamerideals, free for online banking customers. sign in to your online banking to choose your deals today. free for online banking customers. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tami
. walk around shubra and cairo or the poor parts of algiers, and you will see what i'm talking about. a person who drove us to the airport, someone we've known for many years in cairo, was in tears -- [speaking in native tongue] no work. no work for him, no work for his son, no work for his cousin. egypt is trying to get back onto its feet as these other countries are after dictators that failed and failed again. and then they got hit with the revolutionary economics that most countries get hit with. there was a great deal of hope amongst the people in egypt, tunisia and libya that their economies will get back on their feet after this. well, that's really not the way revolutions work historically. usually there are difficult times, and they last for a long time. almost all of these countries need great economic reforms and deep, long-lasting economic reforms. i've been trying to listen to what president morsi and others are saying about economic reforms, and all i hear is confused ideology. and what i've seen is nothing. no reform, no change, no action, and unemployment is getting w
. protesters on the streets of cairo for a fourth straight day. you can see the crowds there. battle lines are now drawn. we're talking about newly empowered islamists versus remnants of the mubarak regime and the country's deeply divided liberals. they're going at it. the president's new powers now. today egyptian president mohammed morsi is meeting with the country's top judges to explain the extraordinary powers that he granted himself on thursday. among the decrees, judges cannot overturn any decision he makes or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constituti
today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any dec
're not clear of what hamas thinks. listening to them speaking in cairo, there was agreed deal of spin for the domestic audience that their goals have been achieved achieved, their victorious. perhaps he was laying the groundwork. that is not clear. but if there is no cease-fire, an escalation is almost certain. >> thank you for your report. please be careful. will the israel/bozell conflict escalated to a ground war? let us know what you think or follow me on twitter. tensions in the mideast driving mikasa of $90 a barrel to keep you apprised of the latest. the pipeline that will bring gas to their key ally and construction will be finished by the second half of 2013. drivers may get some relief at the pump, the national average has dropped by more than 1/4 at $3.41. aaa estimates millions will hit the road for the weekend. going ahead first to the cliff. we have one of reagan's top economic advisers. with the three things a bombast to do twos save us. >> who killed america's sweetest cowboy? i say it is the union. somebody will disagree. coming up. ♪ lissa:y, w some newsbr melissa:
in cairo today, in part the peace talks arguably a great deal for the domestic audience in gaza suggesting some goals have been achieved, and if there is a cease-fire, perhaps lay the groundwork for that earlier today. not entirely clear. the next 24-48 hours, it is almost certain. melissa: thank you for your report, please be careful. so here is our question of the day, wit will be israel-gaza conflict escalate into a ground war? would lovwe would love to hear u have to say. time now for the fuel gauge report, crude oil futures rallied today closing at a one-month high. tensions in the mideast drive in the cost up nearly $90 per barrel. we will keep an eye on that situation for the latest. iran announcing they have begun construction on a $10 billion pipeline that will bring natural gas to their key ally, syria. iran's state-run news agency says construction will be finished by the second half of 2013. drivers might get some relief at the pump just in time for thanksgiving. aaa reports the national average for a gallon of regular gas has dropped by more than a quarter. $3.41. what a deal.
-moon arrived in cairo just hours after egypt's intelligence chief gave an israeli delegation a letter from hamas outlining its conditions for a cease fire. so far on the israeli side, officials say throw people have died. 68 have been wounded as the result of rocket fire from gaza and in gaza, officials say 104 people have been killed. 860 have been wounded since the conflict began. as for fire power, israel says militants in gaza have fired nearly 1,000 rockets at israel. 570 of them have actually struck israel. another 307 have been intercepted by israel's so-called iron dome defense system. meanwhile, israel carried out 80 strikes today. it has now targeted 1,300 sites in gaza since last wednesday ch ben wedeman is in gaza city tonight. how are civilians dealing with this conflict? the numbers are frightening. >> reporter: they're not dealing very well with it. it's a very difficult situation. you have to keep in mind, erin, that here in gaza, they don't have early warning systems. they don't have bomb shelters. they don't have an iron dome system to protect them. so, they feel very exp
on saturday. bret? >> bret: steve harrigan live saturday in cairo. thanks. another day without internet and telephone service with people in war torn syria. they show the government war plane firing rockets on homs this week. video of spoke rising from the bomb strikes in other towns. north korea may be preparing for a rocket launch. sections are strucked in the launch site. but there is speculation that it may be a bluff. to rat the obama administration. and south carolina presidential election. shooting down rockets and missiles is idea behind israel so-called iron dome. said to be effective in conflict with hamas. what. we look at the questions from the pentagon. >> 1,500 rockets were fired at israel from the gaza strip in eight day of fighting. the iron dome missile system said to intercepted most of them. modern warfare game changer in the middle east. >> iron dome, performed, fair to say remarkably well. in the recent escalation. >> only 55 out of the 1,500 ended up falling. >> the u.s. taxpayers invested $275 million to help israel build and seal the iron dome which can stop inco
in cairo. hillary clinton will be arriving later this evening to have negotiations with her israeli counterparts as well as palestinian officials. she will also be heading to cairo to meet with morsi who is meeting with the u.n. secretary general and so every is hoping truth does stick. officials have been hinting there could be one in the next several hours. but on the ground, they are bracing for a possible ground invasion with thousands of soldiers on the border. back to you. >> stay with us over there. we'll be watching hopefully it doesn't happen, but a possibility. we appreciate your report. the nbc team over there, rich article ard engel, he must live in the area because he's always where needs to be. always things exploding around. >> when we come back, we'll talk more about the stories that are likely to drive today's trading, including the crisis in the middle east. we've also got earnings coming up and a speech from ben bernanke. we'll be talking about the looming fiscal cliff. we'll put them all into perspective. i'm glad we got cdw and cisco to design our data center. y
. next week a court in cairo will attempt to decide whether it is even a constitutional move. reza sayah is live for us in cairo. before we talk about how he's justifying the powers, you're getting new information on a huge move from the muslim brotherhood. reza, are you with me? we're going to work on getting -- >> reporter: brooke, the muslim brotherhood has canceled their 1 million man demonstration. of course it could energize the opposition factions behind us with their 1 million man demonstration, but there is absolutely no indication at this point that the muslim brotherhood is losing support. remember, this is a powerful organization, one of the most powerful organizations in the political landscape, in egypt, and at this point, i think many people will look at this at face value, someone sensible in the muslim brotherhood made the decision they have competing demonstrations tomorrow that could be the potential for violence. several days have passed since the decrees and the outcome hasn't been pleasant. was this just a bad miscalculation by the president? >> not at all. it is a
of diplomatic activity taking place in cairo as egypt's president intelligence officials try to broker a truce between the palestinian factions and israel. turkish prime minister also in cairo and later today the u.n. secreta secretary-general ban ki-moon is expected to try to solidify a cessation of hostilities. the conflict is ongoing. hospital officials tell nbc news they are operating at a very limited capacity, they are afraid a ground invasion may push the health facilities here to the brink of collapse. >> thank you, we appreciate that report. eamon moyhedin. we'll have more on the tensions in the middle east throughout the morning. let's get back to this discussion that we were having and i'll make what i was trying to, what my case was, steve and jere jeremy, and even countries that deserve austerity it's easier said than done because people will immediately say you've just made it worse and you took a recession and turned it into almost a depression, so it's almost like people want you to extend the, you know, the credit card, give your wayward teenage son an additional $50,000 on th
reporting from the front lines. protesters took to the streets of cairo today after mohamed morsi basically stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping presidential powers and eliminate the judiciary. demonstrators called on morsi to roll back his decree or resign. at least one person died in clashes with police. demonstrators stormed the headquarters of a party backed by morsi's muslim brotherhood. a spokesman said the building was destroyed, dozens of injuries. >>> 213-foot crane caught fire, it partially collapsed. this was on to a university building in sidney today. the crane was carrying 264 gallons of diesel fuel, flames went 32 feet into the air. no one was injured according to the operator lend lease. i wanted to mention that name because it might sound familiar. it is the same company that operated the crane that partially collapsed in new york city during superstorm sandy. the company is still in the process of reviewing that incident. >>> well, for the first time since his arrest two years ago, bradley manning is expected to take the stand in a pretrial hearing this week. no
months of stalemate, signs of real change and movement on the ground. >> thank you and now to cairo, where president morsi's move to fast track a new constitution is being met with resistance. some say it's a way to diffuse anger to expand his presidential powers and weaken the judiciary, but critics say he's hijacking the constitution. >> erin, today, a special panel voted to approve a draft of e gipsa's new constitution. egyptians will vote yes or not despite objections by factions who say the process was pushed through by islamists who tried to squeeze out the moderates. in a rejected claims that he was being a dictator. >> translator: there is no room to speak of dictatorship. as an egyptian, i have suffered a lot of the lack of democracy, absence of democracy and dictatorship and corruption in my land, and this dictatorship you are talking about does not exist. >> reporter: the president says if egyptians do not like the constitution, they can vote no on the nationwide referendum. we'll see if that calms down his critics. erin? >>> now our fifth story "outfront" 80 days since t
change and movement on the ground. erin? >> thank you, nick. >>> now to cairo, where president morsi's move to fast track the new constitution is being met with resistance. some say it's a way to defuse anger over morsi's decree to expand his presidential powers and weaken the judiciary but critics say he's hijacking the constitution. october 4th because of security concerns. they say they weren't going to put agents in harm's way, they were worried. cnn as you know went to the compound before, found the ambassador's journal. by the time the fbi got there, would all the evidence have been compromised or -- >> sure. i mean, in an arson when a building burns down, it's a crime that consumes its own evidence. what the fbi needs to break a case like this is an informant. many informants. but in the old days they would put a wanted poster up in a post office. you can put it on the internet now. what will break a case like this is money. they can't put a suitcase full of cash on the table. cia could do that. >> and we would assume the cia is doing that, right? obviously as we all now are a
a functioning, working relationship. and now hillary clinton's most important stop on this trip will be in cairo for talk with his president morsi. >> this is will cain. dynamic between hamas and iran, we had an official on that said these missiles have three words on them "made in iran." we also have heard that hamas and iran have had a tense relationship since hamas supported the uprising in syria. what's that relationship and what's iran's role right now? >> absolutely. there are sectarian issues here. iran is predominantly shiite and hamas is predominantly sunni. the leader of hamas moved headquarters out of damascus and sided with the opposition. there is that real tension. in many ways, gaza reflects the kind of rivalry playing out in syria and elsewhere in the region. hamas relies on iran for military training and its most important weaponry, but there is this tension over syria. it's in syria's interest right now to see all the world's attention focused on gaza rather than on damascus to take some of the pressure off. these relationships in the region are shifting. part of what we're see
injuries reported. secretary of state clinton is in jerusalem and she goes to cairo today. this is "varney & company," an all star, pre-holiday lineup. here we go.  >> top story. the unions are excertifying maximum pressure right now the at worst possible time. people want to shop and unions are making both difficult. sciu expects more than a thousand marches at los angeles international airport and say the company they work for, a contractor for the airport broke the union and took away health insurance and demonstrating. and protests planned at o'hare in chicago. a new company providing custodial services there, nonunion, protests. and a strike, and another one at the port in portland. and a huge protest planned at one thousand wal-mart stores on friday. workers angry about wages and benefit and threaten to tie up wal-mart parking lots on what is a crucial shopping day and hostess, the bakers union refusing to make a deal and now the company is going to be liquidated. yes, it is, 18,000 jobs or thereabouts lost, and unions throwing their weight around this holiday week. if you don't w
directly with terrorist organizations. then it's off to cairo and a meet with president morsi because it is the egyptian president that is the liaison if you will in these talks with hamas. the goal here is to create space, buy time to try to see if they can prevent israel from doing a full-fledged ground invasion. seeing if they can get some sort of temporary cease-fire to create room for a more negotiated settlement. shuttle diplomacy is back. >> what about the risk/reward. if she accomplishes something, then that's a great feather in her cap and the administration's. but if she doesn't, does she come off as being ineffective? >> well, there is a risk to this. i talked to the white house aides. i said, look, are you sendinger in because you think there's something precooked that they have a possibility of basically pushing this over the finish line, getting it done and they admitted they're not there. they do feel as if it is needed to sort of nudge things along. you are right, politically, this could be a great way for secretary clinton to finish her four-year tenure at the state d
employee keeping the office open. and when something really big happens in cairo, when something really big happens in mexico city, in beijing, in hong kong, what you do is you ship in one of the star correspondents, or even an anchor. but the difference between covering the news, year after year after year in a country, maybe even learning the language, certainly getting to know the people, getting to know who the movers and shakers are, and what the political dynamic in that country is, that really is not happening much anymore. and parenthetically, what's happening in our business is also happening over in the intelligence field, at the cia. where quite literally -- >> i don't want to go too far there. we're -- i want to talk to you about the role of cable television. which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you've derided ideological coverage of the news, bad for america, you said, making it difficult if not impossible for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote an op-ed piece, this is not good for the republic. what do
under way right now. indications there may be a truce on the horizon. coming from cairo where egypt's president mohammad speaking to mourners saying egypt was passing through difficult days but there could be light at the end of the tunnel and referred to the truce that may be taking place in egypt. he said that the aggression on gaza would end on tuesday. didn't give details about that agreement. reports coming out of israel citing officials on israel radio that a truce could be announced as late as tuesday night this evening with the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. that's what's happening outside of gaza. here in gaza it still feels like a war footing. in the last couple of hours the iz rally israelis have warned of imminent attacks on homes and neighborhoods and forcing people to leave their cities and move into central gaza and an indication that a ground invasion may be imminent if a truce is not sealed within the next couple of hours. you can get a sense there's a great sense of fear among ordinary people of gaza that in coming hours it could go either one
egypt. and that's really the key. she'll go to cairo. egypt is playing the crucial role in this. that new government of mohamed morsi who himself is a member of the muslim brotherhood. there's a lot of sympathy in egypt for hamas. but on the other hand, egypt does want to play a constructive role because they know that they need the help of the united states, the help of the eu, the help of the international community for their economy. so it's a very delicate type of balance. hillary clinton knows the players. she's met several times with benjamin netanyahu. she's met with mahmud abbas, and she really knows the issues, so she's the perfect person to do it. >> jill, it is speculation, but it seems to me that the secretary of state would not be on her way to the middle east at this moment if a ground invasion were imminent. that is not a split-screen picture that the u.s. would like to see, no doubt. but as you said, a lot of what she'll be doing is working the allies. that's what the president's been doing, on the phone with turkey, egypt, countries in the region trying to stabi
in cairo as we speak. we have been deeply involved in helping to stand them up, and we are going to carefully consider what more we can do. i will be having much more to say about that as we move toward the friends of the syrian people meeting in morocco in the second week of december. no other decisions have been made yet, but we consider them on an almost daily basis. at the united states has provided more than $200 million in humanitarian assistance -- syrian people who weapon displaced are facing difficult conditions given the winter that is upon them. this remains a very difficult situation to manage because there are so many interests by all of the players, many of which are contradictory. turkey, for example, is very much at the leadership level, committed to seeing the end of the syrian regime, but incredibly worried that not enough will be done that empowers the kurds, particularly the pkk affiliates. jordan is working hard to maintain stability inside its own country. they are obviously worried about upsetting the delicate demographic balance inside. lebanon has tried v
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